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Painting thoughts

 
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Richard



Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 1035
Location: Elsternwick

PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 12:30 am    Post subject: Painting thoughts Reply with quote

The following is from a set of rules :

Making Samurai Armies Look ‘Right’

You may be remembering samurai armor that you have seen in movies and thinking that painting them may be just too daunting a
task. Well never fear, Chipco will steer you in the right direction! For purposes of discussion, we’ll confine this painting note to
15mm figures. 25mm are similar, but quite a lot more detail will be needed to have them appear correctly.

First, let’s discuss the Mon, the Japanese equivalent of heraldry, and the sashimono. The timeframe of CT is the period when
heraldry and warfare reached its zenith in Japan. Most samurai and many ashigaru wore sashimono, or backbanners, attached to the
rear of their armor. These sashimono were generally brightly colored, rectangular shaped, and carried the heraldic design, or mon, of
their clan. Mon could range from abstract geometric shapes like circles, squares, and stars, to representations of animals and flowers.
The Japanese have always enjoyed a strong sense of design and therefore most mon will be striking in one way or another.
You may decide that you wish to recreate the mon of actual historical clans, and there are many references out there to assist you,
especially the Turnbull and Daisho books cited here later. A more practical route however may be to decide what you are capable of
and proceed from there. It is perfectly acceptable for example to have the back banners of your clans simply one color or another.
Popular colors for back banners would be black, pale blue, white, red, and yellow. Using this you could field a very attractive army of
five clans. Further refinements might add horizontal stripes of a contrasting color; yellow on red, white on black, red on white, or
white on pale blue, for instance. To see how beautiful an army of this sort would look, try screening the battle scene in the movie Ran
by Akira Kurosawa. You will no doubt be impressed by the terrible beauty of this period. Further simple refinements to the
sashimono would be simple geometric designs like circles and squares. From there, the sky is the limit!

Once you have decided on the mon and color scheme of you clan you can turn to painting the armor of your figures. Japanese
armor of this period was more practical and less ornate than that of earlier periods, simplifying the chore of painting your figures
considerably. The armor was lacquered in several colors; black, red, and a reddish brown rust-like color. Most of the samurai you will
be painting will be covered with armor all over their torsos, on their head, on the outsides of their arms, and on the front of their legs.
All this armor will be painted any one of the colors outlined above. If you are using black, bands of a lighter color may be painted
over it for a pleasing effect. Cloth showing through on the arms and legs will be brightly colored and vary from figure to figure. If
you are really daring, you may elect to paint patterns on this cloth like stylized flowers, etc. Samurais will look great even when
simply painted provided you give the eye enough contrast between the armor and the clothing/mon. Some samurais will have
elaborate shoulder and upper arm protectors with stitching on it. Don’t worry about painting the stitches, in a 15mm figure the overall
color/pattern will be sufficient.

Many of your figures, ashigaru especially, will not have a sashimono. They will also usually have a very flat, conical shaped
helmet on. Paint this helmet in the appropriate armor color. Then paint the mon on the helmet and possibly the chest plate of the armor
in a contrasting color – probably white.

Remember that the great appeal of the samurai army on the tabletop lies in the brightness of the colors coupled with the stark
contrast of the armor.
Pay attention to these simple rules and your armies will delight you and friends for a long time to come. Banzai!
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Richard



Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 1035
Location: Elsternwick

PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another method , from the site on my"Awesome" (which I can't spell) thread .You'll find photos of that process there .

Easter time is painting time Exclamation

First I clean and modify (if needed) a baggy/unit of my figures with an Xacto knife.



- Step 2/Primer: I then primer my figures, letting them dry overnight



- Step 3/Brown-Black Base Color: The next day I apply a base coat of a black and dark brown mixture as my background color, my canvas.



- Step 4/Principal Color: Key to all my painting is that I accept the fact that the color I put on a figure’s dark background will initially not be laid on perfectly, so when I apply the initial color, I do so knowing that I will return with my Winsor & Newton Series 7, #1 to cut the lines in tightly to clean up that initial color application.



- Step 5/Clean-Up with Brown-Black: Using my Series 7 brush I repeat this process as I add color, cutting the lines in tight each time with black. I do the same with a spill-over from drybrushing. The combination of dark background base and color added to it makes possible both shadow and highlights. For me, painting is a building and repairing process not a perfect-the-first-time process.



-Step 6/Add White Detail: The addition of the white detail in some ways outlines the different areas where color will be added very much like the lines in a color book.



-Step 7/Clean-Up the White Detail: This is done with the Series 7 brush to provide a neat canvas for the colors that will be added to the different areas of the figure as explained in Step 6.



-Step 8/Add Color Detail: This is the moment most people think of as painting the figure. It is where the color is added to the skin, and clothing. Once the color has been added, I tend to go back over those colors with a highlight made of the color mixed with while. My experience is that the combination of the color-white highlight is what makes the color pop.



Before I begin painting a new period of figures, I select a representative sampling of those figures, and I paint prototypes that will serve as my testing ground and guide for the hundred/thousands that follow. Once the prototypes are done, I tend to paint unit figures from the baggies in groups of about 12; an assembly line approach.

As a general rule, I do the base cover detail (grass, dirty, rock, etc usually by Woodland Scenics) after I have completed the painting of the entire army. Base decorating makes a mess, so I like to do it all at once. Detailing the bases for my 2,700 samurai took three weeks.
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LyleD



Joined: 25 Sep 2006
Posts: 560
Location: East Brunswick

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 11:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You left out watching Akira Kurosawa films for inspiration from your process Shocked "Ran" and "Kagemusha" are very colourful and better for this purpose than the early black and white films "Seven Samurai" etc.

Lyle
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von Lucky



Joined: 28 Feb 2008
Posts: 723
Location: Docklands

PostPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2011 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just watched Kagemusha again while I cleaned / glued my army together (bought off the Quartermaster many moons ago).

I forgot how long (but good!) the film is - definitely good inspiration!
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leadgend



Joined: 03 Oct 2006
Posts: 663
Location: Brunswick

PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2011 5:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LyleD wrote:
You left out watching Akira Kurosawa films for inspiration from your process Shocked "Ran" and "Kagemusha" are very colourful and better for this purpose than the early black and white films "Seven Samurai" etc.

Lyle


Of course nobody would think of doing their army in black and white with a camera crew etc as the camp would they. Smile
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Richard



Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 1035
Location: Elsternwick

PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2011 6:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm or just a camp of Seven Samurai .....and of course our ambush markers are Ninjas -right ? Wink
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Brad
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 216
Location: Watsonia

PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2011 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just so long as it's not these nijas...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmOS2v898o0&feature=related
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Richard



Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 1035
Location: Elsternwick

PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2011 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bhahahaha Laughing
OMG bring on the movie "Ninja Fail"

My ninjas are more like these Wink

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1eq1XVM-eg
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